Items where Author is "Ashdown, Kimberley"

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[5] research outputs

Articles

Rue, C. A., Myers, S. D., Coakley, S. L., Ashdown, K., Lee, B. J., Hale, B. J., Siddall, A. G., Needham-Beck, S., Hinde, K., Osofa, J. I., Walke, F. S., Fieldhouse, A., Vine, C., Doherty, J., Flood, T. R., Walker, E. F., Wardle, S. L., Greeves, J. P. and Blacke, S. D. (2023) Changes in Physical Performance during British Army Junior Entry, British Army Standard Entry, and Royal Air Force Basic Training. Changes in Physical Performance during British Army Junior Entry, British Army Standard Entry, and Royal Air Force Basic Training. ISSN 2633-3775

Lee, B. J., Flood, T. R., Hiles, A., Walker, E. F., Wheeler, L., Ashdown, K., Willems, M. E. T., Costello, R., Greisler, L., Romano, P., Hill, G. and Kuennen, M.R. (2022) Anthocyanin-rich blackcurrant extract preserves gastrointestinal barrier permeability and reduces enterocyte damage but has no effect on microbial translocation and inflammation after exertional heat stress. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 32 (4). pp. 265-274. ISSN 1543-2742

Joyce, K. E., Delamere, J., Bradwell, S. B., Myers, S. D., Ashdown, K., Rue, C. A., Lucas, S. J. E., Thomas, O. D., Fountain, A., Edsell, M. R., Myers, F., Malein, W., Imray, C., Clarke, A., Lewis, C. T., Newman, C., Johnson, B., Cadigan, P., Wright, A. and Bradwell, A. (2020) Hypoxia is not the primary mechanism contributing to exercise-induced proteinuria. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 6 (1). ISSN 2055-7647

Hiles, A., Flood, T. R., Lee, B. J., Wheeler, L., Costello, R., Walker, E. F., Ashdown, K., Kuennen, M.R. and Willems, M. E. T. (2020) Dietary supplementation with New Zealand blackcurrant extract enhances fat oxidation during submaximal exercise in the heat. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 23 (10). pp. 908-912. ISSN 1440-2440

Myers, S. D., Bradwell, A. R., Ashdown, K., Rue, C., Delamere, J., Thomas, O. D., Lucas, S. J. E., Wright, A. D. and Harris, S. J. (2018) Acetazolamide reduces exercise capacity following a 5-day ascent to 4559 m in a randomised study. BMJ open sport & exercise medicine, 4 (1). pp. 1-7. ISSN 2055-7647

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